Free German Classes

Internet German Language Courses Online

Free College Classes Online

Articles

Careers

Free German classes give you foundation skills in speaking one of the hardest European languages to speak and understand. English speakers are going to have to get used to how Germans build words, but once these stumbling blocks are surmounted, you'll find many of the words in German and English are similar, due the Anglo-Saxons' ancient connection to present-day Germany and the Germanic languages.

Free German Classes OnlineTo begin learning Germany, you'll want to take some basic introductions to the German language. MIT offers the full scope of German language-building courses online. These free online college courses may not have the German labs that most college linguistics classes have, but you'll otherwise be able to learn at your own pace, so you won't get frustrated picking up a new language.

Free MIT German Courses

To get a grounding in German, MIT offers its OpenCourseWare versions of its coordinated instructions courses in German. These four courses are what most college students wanting to learn German would undergo.

Intensive Study of German Language and Culture is a full immersion in German studies, including writing a term paper in German. You'll be exposed to the social, cultural, and political landscape of contemporary Germany. Included are television, radio, newspapers, and periodicals from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland.

Free German Cultural Classes

Learning the German language probably isn't an isolated fascination. It's natural to want to learn about the cultural facets of Germany. Here are a few courses you'll find enlightening, if you are interested in the Deutschland and its peoples.

Germany and Its European Context takes Friedrich Nietzsche as a departure point and studies Germany literary and visual culture of recent decades. Other countries cultural exchange with Germany will be touched upon, including Poland, Denmark, France, and the United Kingdom. Books, film, painting, and stage performance are going to be highlighted.

German Cinema from 1945 to Present is part of the Visual Histories series. Not only will you touch on depictions of Germans in the years just after World War II, but you'll focus heavily on the "New German Cinema" of the 1960s and 1970s. You'll also study East German filmmaking, as well as the strange direction much of German cinema has taken from the 1990s onward.